The Confiscation of Bank Deposits & the Derivatives Debt.

Russian Roulette: Taxpayers could be on the hook for Trillions in Oil Derivatives

The sudden dramatic collapse in the price of oil appears to be an act of geopolitical warfare against Russia.

The result could be trillions of dollars in oil derivative losses; and depositors and taxpayers could be liable, following repeal of key portions of the Dodd-Frank Act signed into law on December 16th.

On December 11th, Senator Elizabeth Warren charged Citigroup with “holding government funding hostage to ram through its government bailout provision.” At issue was a section in the omnibus budget bill repealing the Lincoln Amendment to the Dodd-Frank Act, which protected depositor funds by requiring the largest banks to push out a portion of their derivatives business into non-FDIC-insured subsidiaries.

Continue reading report here: Russian Roulette with Taxpayers Money

Watch the following interview explaining the details about The Confiscation of Bank Deposits & the Derivatives Debt

Bail-in & the Financial Stability Board

FSBFinancial Stability Board (FSB)

On December 11, 2014, the US House passed a bill repealing the Dodd-Frank requirement that risky derivatives be pushed into big-bank subsidiaries, leaving our deposits and pensions exposed to massive derivatives losses.

The bill was vigorously challenged by Senator Elizabeth Warren; but the tide turned when Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorganChase, stepped into the ring. Perhaps what prompted his intervention was the unanticipated $40 drop in the price of oil. As financial blogger Michael Snyder points out, that drop could trigger a derivatives payout that could bankrupt the biggest banks. And if the G20’s new “bail-in” rules are formalized, depositors and pensioners could be on the hook.

The new bail-in rules were discussed in my last post. They are edicts of the Financial Stability Board (FSB), an unelected body of central bankers and finance ministers headquartered in the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland. Where did the FSB get these sweeping powers, and is its mandate legally enforceable?
Those questions were addressed in an article I wrote in June 2009, two months after the FSB was formed, titled “Big Brother in Basel: BIS Financial Stability Board Undermines National Sovereignty.” It linked the strange boot shape of the BIS to a line from Orwell’s 1984: “a boot stamping on a human face—forever.” The concerns raised there seem to be materializing, so I’m republishing the bulk of that article. We need to be paying attention, lest the bail-in juggernaut steamroll over us unchallenged…

Continue reading from original source here: The Global Bankers Coup: Bail-In and the FSB

FINANCIAL REPRESSION for Dummies…

Unreported foreign accounts face penalties of 50% of the historical high balance of the account!

“If you have an unreported foreign account, time is quickly running out to comply. There are amnesty options available but only for those who act quickly. Do nothing and you could face penalties of 50% of the historical high balance of the account.”

Hong Kong Signs FATCA Pact

china-flag fatca

The U.S. Treasury Department has confirmed that Hong Kong has signed an agreement to report certain financial account information directly to the IRS. Under the 2010 FATCA law (Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act), foreign banks must review their accounts and report any accounts with ties to the United States. Banks that fail to comply are subject to high withholding taxes and may find it difficult to continue to do business in global markets.

Over 40 countries have signed formal FATCA agreements with dozens more under negotiation. Hong Kong’s agreement, however, is a bit unusual. Most countries have crafted agreements that require the financial institution to report information to that institution’s domestic tax authority, which in turn sends it to the IRS. Many foreign countries are reluctant to have banks providing information directly to the United States.

Hong Kong has elected to join Bermuda, Austria, Japan, Switzerland and Chile as the countries that will require their banks to report directly to the IRS…

Hong Kong Signs FATCA Pact

Financial repression

Understanding Physical Asset Diversification

James G. Rickards is an American lawyer, economist, and investment banker:
View Wikipedia Bio Link Here

About economist Richard Duncan via Amazon

“Falling to plan, is planning to fail”
If you have not yet talked to an independent adviser about full diversification that includes alternative strategies, now is the time to start!

Demographics: The Generation Battle

When Americas social security and health care and entitlement systems were first conceived, the country has much different age distribution. There were roughly 7 active workers per retiree, and the ability to transfer some of that employee wealth to support older citizens was supportable.

But with the arrival on the scene of the Baby Boom as well as advances in longetivity, the math changed dramatically. By 2005, there were only 5 workers per retiree. And by 2030, just 15 short years away, there will be less than 3.

Our national demographic architecture no longer can afford the entitlement system we have. And that’s even assuming entitlements were currently sufficiently funded. But as the last chapter showed, the existing programs are underfunded to the tune of $100-200 Trillion.

America’s demographic situation is a ticking time bomb. The older generation is already competing more fiercely than ever with younger ones in the job market, as many seniors can’t afford to retire. Youth also has to contend with trends like automation, outsourcing, and high unemployment/underemployment, which further handicap their ability to build capital and, importantly, to afford all the assets (stocks, houses, etc) that the Boomers are counting on selling to them.

For the best viewing experience, watch the above video in hi-definition (HD) and in expanded screen mode.

Age distribution is too lopsided to support entitlements

Age distribution is too lopsided to support entitlements

Chapter 15 of the Crash Course Short Video Page Link: Demographics: Age distribution is too lopsided to support entitlements

Money Market Funds: New Exit Suspensions & Exit Fees!

SEC Approves Tighter Money-Fund Rules
Plan Allows Funds to Temporarily Block Withdrawals in Times of Stress

SECMoney market funds new rules have been passed by the Securities and Exchange Commission;

Money market funds can impose a liquidity fee on redemptions if the fund’s weekly liquidity falls below the level required by regulations.

Redemptions may also be suspended temporarily. The SEC calls them redemption “gates.”

Institutional prime money market funds are required to float the net asset value, or NAV, rather than keeping share prices fixed at $1.

See link: SEC Adopts Money Market Fund Rules

Note: An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund.

Investing Abroad: What US Investors Need to Know

At a time when overindebted governments are making increasingly desperate grabs for their citizens’ money, keeping all your assets invested in one country—and denominated in one currency—is a very bad idea.

Image courtesy of Gordon T Long

Image courtesy of Gordon T Long

A vitally important question for you

 Do you have a bank account in another country? If not, you should hurry up & get one.

Holding foreign currencies in an account outside of the United States is the way to go if you REALLY want to diversify your assets internationally—but in the last few years the US government has left no stone unturned to make it harder for investors to get a foreign bank account. It’s not too late, though—there are still feasible ways to open one. But you have to act quickly, before Washington enacts even stricter controls in a desperate grab for your money.

Most people know of the general investment benefits of not having all your asset eggs in one basket. This portfolio-diversification concept—investing in multiple asset classes—also applies to the political risk associated with your home country. It is a risk few people think about diversifying.

In short, internationalization is prudent because it frees you from absolute dependence on any one country. Achieve that freedom, and it becomes very difficult for any country to control you.

While diversifying political risk is something that everyone in the world should strive to achieve, it goes double for those who live under a government that is sinking deeper into fiscal trouble (e.g., most Western governments).

Here are a few compelling arguments on why you should diversify, diversify, diversify—across different countries, exchanges, currencies, banks, and asset classes.

1: IMF Endorses Capital Controls

Bloomberg reported that the “IMF has endorsed the use of capital controls in certain circumstances.“

“In a reversal of its historic support for unrestricted flows of money across borders, the IMF said controls can be useful…”

2: There Is Academic Support for Capital Controls

Harvard Economists Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff suggest debt write-downs and ‘financial repression’, meaning the use of a combination of moderate inflation and constraints on the flow of capital to reduce debt burdens.

3: Confiscation of Savings on the Rise

The IMF, in a report entitled “Taxing Times,” published in October of 2013, on page 49, states:

“The sharp deterioration of the public finances in many countries has revived interest in a capital levy—a one-off tax on private wealth—as an exceptional measure to restore debt sustainability.”

A study from the IMF: The tax rates needed to for a sample of 15 euro area countries is 10% on households with a positive net worth.

Note: The tax would apply to anyone with a positive net worth. And the 10% wealth-grab would, of course, be on top of regular income taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, etc.

4: We Like Pension Funds

Unfortunately, it’s not just savings. From a paper by Carmen Reinhart & M. Belén Sbrancia:

A subtle type of debt restructuring takes the form of ‘financial repression.’ Financial repression includes directed lending to government by captive domestic audiences (such as pension funds), explicit or implicit caps on interest rates, regulation of cross-border capital movements, and (generally) a tighter connection between government and banks.

Yes, your retirement account is now a “captive domestic audience.”
“Directed” means “compulsory” in the above statement, and you may not have a choice if “regulation of cross-border capital movements”—capital controls—are instituted.

5: The Eurozone Sanctions Money-Grabs

Germany’s Bundesbank weighed in on this subject last January:

“Countries about to go bankrupt should draw on the private wealth of their citizens through a one-off capital levy before asking other states for help.”

And it’s not just in Germany. On February 12, 2014, Reuters reported on an EU commission document that states:

The savings of the European Union’s 500 million citizens could be used to fund long-term investments to boost the economy and help plug the gap left by banks since the financial crisis.

Reuters reported that the Commission plans to request a draft law, “to mobilize more personal pension savings for long-term financing.”

EU officials are explicitly telling us that the pensions and savings of its citizens are fair game to meet the union’s financial needs. If you live in Europe, the writing is on the wall.

Actually, it’s already under way… Reuters recently reported that Spain has introduced a blanket taxation rate of .03% on all bank account deposits, in a move aimed at… generating revenues for the country’s cash-strapped autonomous communities.

6: Canada Jumps on the Confiscation Bandwagon

You may recall this text from last year’s budget in Canada:

“The Government proposes to implement a bail-in regime for systemically important banks.”

A bail-in is what they call it when a government takes depositors’ money to plug a bank’s financial holes—just as was done in Cyprus last year.

The bank can be recapitalized and returned to viability through the very rapid conversion of certain bank liabilities into regulatory capital.

What’s a “bank liability”? Your deposits.

7: FATCA

Have you considered why the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act was passed into law? It was supposed to crack down on tax evaders and collect unpaid tax revenue.
However, the result of FATCA keeps US savers trapped in US banks and in the US dollar, where the US could implement a Cyprus-like bail-in. Given the debt load in the US and given statements made by government officials, this seems like a reasonable conclusion to draw.

Source>http://www.caseyresearch.com/articles/the-single-most-important-strategy-most-investors-ignore-1